Blog

JUL 31 2019
ALL ARTICLES

Coughing dogs I Kennel Cough

‘Hack, hack, hack...!’


Canine Infectious Tracheobronchitis (aka Kennel Cough) is a highly contagious bronchitis which can affect dogs of all ages. This illness is triggered by various viruses and bacteria causing inflammation of the respiratory system. You may notice a sudden onset of violent hacking cough, often followed by a retching or gagging-like motions. Some people also describe this noise as if something got stuck in their dog’s throat.


Transmission of kennel cough readily occurs via contaminated air (just like human cold & flu), direct contact between healthy and sick animals, and exposure to infected objects such as bowls or toys. Consequently, kennel cough is often observed in shared facilities including dog parks and boarding kennels, where a large number of dogs pass through every day.


Many dogs are mildly affected with kennel cough and the symptoms often resolve on their own within few days. With severe pain and discomfort, your vet may prescribe antibiotics and anti-inflammatories to help your furry friend get back on their paws faster.

Kennel cough is generally considered non-life threatening with minimal intervention required from the vets. In some cases, however, this could escalate into a fatal pneumonia if left untreated. It’s important to keep a close eye on those that are more vulnerable to sickness like puppies and senior dogs, and those with already compromised immune system.


What other signs should you look out for?

- Decrease in appetite                                  - Discharge from eyes

- Fever                                                               - Listlessness

- Runny nose                                                   - Sneezing

- Lethargy                                                        - Excessive phlegm

- Recent encounters with other dogs


 To help prevent your dog from contracting this disease is to get them vaccinated early on. 

There are two types of kennel cough vaccine currently available in NZ market; intranasal (Nobivac KC) and injectable (Canigen). Have a chat to your vet about which is the best option for your dog. After completing the initial vaccinations regime, boosters are given yearly for ongoing protection.


Kennel cough symptoms are usually short-lived so you should expect them to subside considerably after several days. However, if you think your dog’s condition is getting worse, we strongly advise consulting with a veterinarian about treatment options to avoid further complications. Your vet may recommend additional tests such as x-rays and bloods to determine the severity of infection. This could also help them rule out other potential causes/ underlying medical issues.

Tags:

‘Hack, hack, hack...!’


Canine Infectious Tracheobronchitis (aka Kennel Cough) is a highly contagious bronchitis which can affect dogs of all ages. This illness is triggered by various viruses and bacteria causing inflammation of the respiratory system. You may notice a sudden onset of violent hacking cough, often followed by a retching or gagging-like motions. Some people also describe this noise as if something got stuck in their dog’s throat.


Transmission of kennel cough readily occurs via contaminated air (just like human cold & flu), direct contact between healthy and sick animals, and exposure to infected objects such as bowls or toys. Consequently, kennel cough is often observed in shared facilities including dog parks and boarding kennels, where a large number of dogs pass through every day.


Many dogs are mildly affected with kennel cough and the symptoms often resolve on their own within few days. With severe pain and discomfort, your vet may prescribe antibiotics and anti-inflammatories to help your furry friend get back on their paws faster.

Kennel cough is generally considered non-life threatening with minimal intervention required from the vets. In some cases, however, this could escalate into a fatal pneumonia if left untreated. It’s important to keep a close eye on those that are more vulnerable to sickness like puppies and senior dogs, and those with already compromised immune system.


What other signs should you look out for?

- Decrease in appetite                                  - Discharge from eyes

- Fever                                                               - Listlessness

- Runny nose                                                   - Sneezing

- Lethargy                                                        - Excessive phlegm

- Recent encounters with other dogs


 To help prevent your dog from contracting this disease is to get them vaccinated early on. 

There are two types of kennel cough vaccine currently available in NZ market; intranasal (Nobivac KC) and injectable (Canigen). Have a chat to your vet about which is the best option for your dog. After completing the initial vaccinations regime, boosters are given yearly for ongoing protection.


Kennel cough symptoms are usually short-lived so you should expect them to subside considerably after several days. However, if you think your dog’s condition is getting worse, we strongly advise consulting with a veterinarian about treatment options to avoid further complications. Your vet may recommend additional tests such as x-rays and bloods to determine the severity of infection. This could also help them rule out other potential causes/ underlying medical issues.

Tags: