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SEP 03 2019
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Canine Healing Hands

Posted in: Dog, Pet

A life full of working with animals, big or small, Rochelle studied and qualified as a Veterinary Nurse and worked in a Small and Large animal and Equine Clinic in Drury.  From there she went on to work breeding Thoroughbreds in Clevedon, and for the past 15 years was a Handler/Trainer for MPI and the Detector Dog Programme, working dogs defending the borders from unwanted Quarantine pests.

Having her own German Shepherd “Delta” diagnosed with severe Spondolosis, Rochelle looked at other modalities to help her be more comfortable and learned about the field of Canine Massage.  Guided to the Chicago School of Canine Massage she applied and completed her Advanced Mentorship in Certified Canine Massage Therapy, followed by several hours of observations and case studies back in New Zealand too.  Returning to Chicago to sit the National Board of Animal Acupressure and Massage exam only a year later to be currently the only NBCAAM Certified Canine Massage practitioner in New Zealand.  

Canine Healing Hands is a career passion to be able to help many dogs of all backgrounds be the best they can be, being able to do something that truly moves you and changes the lives of the dogs and owners is truly magic.  From shelter dogs with amputations, to dogs with anxiety behavioural issues, to Championship competition dogs be it Breed, Obedience or Agility, the aged arthritic dogs, recovery from surgery and wonderful relaxation massage just because, Rochelle has been blessed to witness the transformations in so many clients since beginning her business.  


Therapeutic Canine Massage can:

  • Improve circulation 
  • Aid recovery after surgery
  • Increase Passive Range of Motion
  • Reduce anxiety
  • Rebuild ability for touch
  • Provide relief for muscle tightness from structural problems, like arthritis, cruciate surgeries etc
  • Recovery for canine athletes
  • Palliative care 



'Lani' – Greyhound suffered vicious attack.

Let me introduce Lani, a beautiful blue Greyhound, and the victim of a vicious dog attack back in early December 2017.  Her attack was horrific and resulted in her requiring 6 or 7 surgeries, 4 skin grafts and thousands of sutures, all accompanied by 7 weeks of veterinary hospitalisation before she was fit enough to be able to return home.  

Lani had received the best veterinary care and the team at Vet Physio helped her recovery with underwater treadmill and Physiotherapy at VSA Mt Wellington.  I introduced myself to Jean via her story on Facebook to let her know about the availability of Certified Canine Massage Therapy and how I knew it could be of great value to Lani and her recovery.  I offered to gift Lani her first few sessions to help with what I know had been an extremely expensive exercise so far.   Once we had the OK from the vets to proceed with the massage we started with her sessions.  Lani was such a real trooper, meeting a complete stranger and allowing that moment to connect to allow me to touch her, where she had been so seriously wounded and after so many surgeries and stitches was a big moment in our relationship moving forward.   


 

The injuries that Lani sustained were severe to say the least requiring several surgeries to rebuild her body, skin grafts were needed to make ends meet to put it simply.  As we know there was bound to be some pretty significant scaring from this attack, and I knew from my training that the massage would help her get her skin scarring tension released and break down the multiple layers of adhesions that happen via healing.  Lani’s skin was insanely tight across her entire abdomen and her affected elbow, shoulder and hind leg surgeries.  With a normal dog there is usually an amount of skin that is able to be moved slightly and it loosens further with the right massage techniques, there was nothing to move at all when I first started with Lani’s massages.  Before any deeper tissues can be worked on we have to begin with the skin layer firstly.  Lani was restricted in how much she could move her legs, as you would be if wearing clothes that allowed you to move but not fully, as her skin was so tight on her body, especially after so many skin grafts to repair her body.

Fascia is a connective tissue that connects all layers of all tissues throughout our bodies and that of animals too,  my massages worked on a lot of releasing her fascia to allow her more movement gradually, then on to breaking down skin scarring adhesions and then onto the deeper muscles and the restrictions there.  Seeing wee little wrinkles in her tummy and hind leg were so wonderful, and even more were the messages from Jean her mum later after the massages to say, wow she’s trying to play now, or she’s trying to roach, things she hadn’t done for months, now these may not seem like major milestones but they actually are.  Once she was starting to feel less fascia restrictions she was able to move more easily and that reduced pain revived the playfulness that she had lost for so long.


Over the course of our next 5 massages we saw a dramatic change in Lani and her body too.  She was able to stretch out her hind legs and fronts too more easily and she started to really enjoy having a good long relaxed full out stretch.  We were now working at a much deeper level in her scars and adhesions too.  Her mum was noticing more and more of the old Lani behaviours coming back, apparently even some of her naughtiness too lol.  I was assigned the blame for these, but after thinking about it was totally fine accepting that responsibility, after all if our massages tighter were making her feel that much better that she was up to her old tricks again then that was fine by me.  We are still continuing with her massages every 3 weeks as it helps her skin fascia stay relaxed and the maintenance massages are now a part of her and her big brother Jesse’s normal life, actually now when I turn up with the Magic Mat it is a race to see who gets to lie down on it first, at times they don’t leave enough room for me.  They play hard have great fun doing Greyhound zoomies and know that when they have those unexpected tumbles or slips that mum gets hold of Rochelle and she comes over with her Magic Mat and all will be fine, ready to get back out and enjoy life.


Jesse had already had his turn with his massage but he wanted to hang on the Magic Mat while Lani had her turn, you can see how well her shoulder and elbow are healed up now too.

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A life full of working with animals, big or small, Rochelle studied and qualified as a Veterinary Nurse and worked in a Small and Large animal and Equine Clinic in Drury.  From there she went on to work breeding Thoroughbreds in Clevedon, and for the past 15 years was a Handler/Trainer for MPI and the Detector Dog Programme, working dogs defending the borders from unwanted Quarantine pests.

Having her own German Shepherd “Delta” diagnosed with severe Spondolosis, Rochelle looked at other modalities to help her be more comfortable and learned about the field of Canine Massage.  Guided to the Chicago School of Canine Massage she applied and completed her Advanced Mentorship in Certified Canine Massage Therapy, followed by several hours of observations and case studies back in New Zealand too.  Returning to Chicago to sit the National Board of Animal Acupressure and Massage exam only a year later to be currently the only NBCAAM Certified Canine Massage practitioner in New Zealand.  

Canine Healing Hands is a career passion to be able to help many dogs of all backgrounds be the best they can be, being able to do something that truly moves you and changes the lives of the dogs and owners is truly magic.  From shelter dogs with amputations, to dogs with anxiety behavioural issues, to Championship competition dogs be it Breed, Obedience or Agility, the aged arthritic dogs, recovery from surgery and wonderful relaxation massage just because, Rochelle has been blessed to witness the transformations in so many clients since beginning her business.  


Therapeutic Canine Massage can:

  • Improve circulation 
  • Aid recovery after surgery
  • Increase Passive Range of Motion
  • Reduce anxiety
  • Rebuild ability for touch
  • Provide relief for muscle tightness from structural problems, like arthritis, cruciate surgeries etc
  • Recovery for canine athletes
  • Palliative care 



'Lani' – Greyhound suffered vicious attack.

Let me introduce Lani, a beautiful blue Greyhound, and the victim of a vicious dog attack back in early December 2017.  Her attack was horrific and resulted in her requiring 6 or 7 surgeries, 4 skin grafts and thousands of sutures, all accompanied by 7 weeks of veterinary hospitalisation before she was fit enough to be able to return home.  

Lani had received the best veterinary care and the team at Vet Physio helped her recovery with underwater treadmill and Physiotherapy at VSA Mt Wellington.  I introduced myself to Jean via her story on Facebook to let her know about the availability of Certified Canine Massage Therapy and how I knew it could be of great value to Lani and her recovery.  I offered to gift Lani her first few sessions to help with what I know had been an extremely expensive exercise so far.   Once we had the OK from the vets to proceed with the massage we started with her sessions.  Lani was such a real trooper, meeting a complete stranger and allowing that moment to connect to allow me to touch her, where she had been so seriously wounded and after so many surgeries and stitches was a big moment in our relationship moving forward.   


 

The injuries that Lani sustained were severe to say the least requiring several surgeries to rebuild her body, skin grafts were needed to make ends meet to put it simply.  As we know there was bound to be some pretty significant scaring from this attack, and I knew from my training that the massage would help her get her skin scarring tension released and break down the multiple layers of adhesions that happen via healing.  Lani’s skin was insanely tight across her entire abdomen and her affected elbow, shoulder and hind leg surgeries.  With a normal dog there is usually an amount of skin that is able to be moved slightly and it loosens further with the right massage techniques, there was nothing to move at all when I first started with Lani’s massages.  Before any deeper tissues can be worked on we have to begin with the skin layer firstly.  Lani was restricted in how much she could move her legs, as you would be if wearing clothes that allowed you to move but not fully, as her skin was so tight on her body, especially after so many skin grafts to repair her body.

Fascia is a connective tissue that connects all layers of all tissues throughout our bodies and that of animals too,  my massages worked on a lot of releasing her fascia to allow her more movement gradually, then on to breaking down skin scarring adhesions and then onto the deeper muscles and the restrictions there.  Seeing wee little wrinkles in her tummy and hind leg were so wonderful, and even more were the messages from Jean her mum later after the massages to say, wow she’s trying to play now, or she’s trying to roach, things she hadn’t done for months, now these may not seem like major milestones but they actually are.  Once she was starting to feel less fascia restrictions she was able to move more easily and that reduced pain revived the playfulness that she had lost for so long.


Over the course of our next 5 massages we saw a dramatic change in Lani and her body too.  She was able to stretch out her hind legs and fronts too more easily and she started to really enjoy having a good long relaxed full out stretch.  We were now working at a much deeper level in her scars and adhesions too.  Her mum was noticing more and more of the old Lani behaviours coming back, apparently even some of her naughtiness too lol.  I was assigned the blame for these, but after thinking about it was totally fine accepting that responsibility, after all if our massages tighter were making her feel that much better that she was up to her old tricks again then that was fine by me.  We are still continuing with her massages every 3 weeks as it helps her skin fascia stay relaxed and the maintenance massages are now a part of her and her big brother Jesse’s normal life, actually now when I turn up with the Magic Mat it is a race to see who gets to lie down on it first, at times they don’t leave enough room for me.  They play hard have great fun doing Greyhound zoomies and know that when they have those unexpected tumbles or slips that mum gets hold of Rochelle and she comes over with her Magic Mat and all will be fine, ready to get back out and enjoy life.


Jesse had already had his turn with his massage but he wanted to hang on the Magic Mat while Lani had her turn, you can see how well her shoulder and elbow are healed up now too.

Tags: