Blog

FEB 16 2017
ALL ARTICLES

Does Your Cat Have a Drinking Problem?

Posted in: Cat

As the weather starts to warm up a pet’s water requirements naturally increase. But if you become aware that your cat or dog has started drinking more water than usual it might be a sign of some very significant underlying problems. The earlier we can diagnose and treat these problems, the better!

Possible causes of drinking more are:

A change in the weather and/or humidity
A change in your cat’s activity level
A change in your cat’s food
A urinary tract infection
An overactive thyroid gland (read more about our hyperthyroid treatment in our What We Do page)
Progressive kidney disease
Hormonal imbalance
Liver failure
Diabetes

As you can see, there are many possibilities. And what’s more, each of them warrants their own level of concern. A visit to your vet will be necessary to determine the actual underlying cause in your cat’s particular case.

Dogs and cats need to consume 60-70ml of water per kilogram of body weight each day. This means that for an average 4.5kg cat it needs about 300ml per day.

What should I expect when I call my vet?

Your vet will most likely recommend some pathology tests requiring a blood and/ or urine sample to help determine the cause of the polydipsia (increased drinking).

A general blood profile can provide information on kidney and liver enzymes, glucose levels and also assess the health of the red and white blood cells. Further blood tests can be run, when indicated, to assess thyroid hormone levels.

A great deal of information can also be obtained from a urine sample from your cat - including the presence of glucose, blood, protein and the concentration of the urine sample. You may be requested to collect a sample from home – not an easy task but achievable if your cat uses a litter tray.

The staff at Pet and Vet are happy to discuss your concerns on the phone then book a consult if needed. Feel free to contact us on 09) 489 6263 or come in and see us.

Here's to early diagnosis! 



Tags: Pet, Cat, Vet, Pet care, Veterinary Medicine, Cattery, Pet and Vet, Animal Health

As the weather starts to warm up a pet’s water requirements naturally increase. But if you become aware that your cat or dog has started drinking more water than usual it might be a sign of some very significant underlying problems. The earlier we can diagnose and treat these problems, the better!

Possible causes of drinking more are:

A change in the weather and/or humidity
A change in your cat’s activity level
A change in your cat’s food
A urinary tract infection
An overactive thyroid gland (read more about our hyperthyroid treatment in our What We Do page)
Progressive kidney disease
Hormonal imbalance
Liver failure
Diabetes

As you can see, there are many possibilities. And what’s more, each of them warrants their own level of concern. A visit to your vet will be necessary to determine the actual underlying cause in your cat’s particular case.

Dogs and cats need to consume 60-70ml of water per kilogram of body weight each day. This means that for an average 4.5kg cat it needs about 300ml per day.

What should I expect when I call my vet?

Your vet will most likely recommend some pathology tests requiring a blood and/ or urine sample to help determine the cause of the polydipsia (increased drinking).

A general blood profile can provide information on kidney and liver enzymes, glucose levels and also assess the health of the red and white blood cells. Further blood tests can be run, when indicated, to assess thyroid hormone levels.

A great deal of information can also be obtained from a urine sample from your cat - including the presence of glucose, blood, protein and the concentration of the urine sample. You may be requested to collect a sample from home – not an easy task but achievable if your cat uses a litter tray.

The staff at Pet and Vet are happy to discuss your concerns on the phone then book a consult if needed. Feel free to contact us on 09) 489 6263 or come in and see us.

Here's to early diagnosis! 



Tags: Pet, Cat, Vet, Pet care, Veterinary Medicine, Cattery, Pet and Vet, Animal Health